It is the silly season already!

Just because you can, doesn’t mean it’s OK.

Victorian Volcanic Plains Conservation Management Network

I always think of Christmas as the silly season and that has started already with Christmas trees and other decorations  in the larger stores and we haven’t even had the Grand Final.

The other ‘silly season’ is when contractors think it is OK to drive on wet #VVP grassland roadsides and that it won’t cause any damage. I took these photos yesterday on a roadside in Moorabool Shire. Lucky for them it is not a high conservation value roadside, but still no excuse to drive off road or through a small wetland area.

                                                 small seasonal roadside wetland

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Planting native grass to control mosquito borne disease

Yellow robin

Did you know that if you want to control mosquito borne disease it may help to plant native grasses? The reasoning as to why this might be so is a bit of a yarn. Bear with me.

Living near a river, mosquitoes are inevitable, but some times they are worse than others. And they are a worry, as mosquito-borne diseases like Ross River Fever and maybe even the sinister “Buruli ulcer” are becoming more common even in Melbourne.

Microbats, those little flutterers that are about the size of a mouse (“flittermice” is an old name), eat about half their body weight in insects every night. Including mosquitoes. Up to 500 insects an hour. But the bats need somewhere to hang out and sleep during the day, and this is typically in little crevices and hollows in old trees. Continue reading

Keeping ahead of harlequin bugs

With a brief moment of warm weather on September 2 this year, the harlequin bugs are on the march again.

Many gardeners around Bacchus Marsh have encountered plagues of these sap-sucking critters. They are remarkably adaptable, feeding off hosts as widespread as mallow, pepper tree, citrus, tomatoes and rhubarb. Most insects that are leaf-chewers only feed off one or a few closely related species of plant, because they need to specialise their metabolism to overcome the chemical defenses of the plant. Sap-suckers bypass the leaf with its battery of noxious compounds, and tap straight into the sweet flow of the plant’s sap, which is relatively free of chemical defenses. Continue reading

Rainfall report

Clouds shuffle across a sullen sky, staring down at a landscape that is waiting in limbo until the autumn rains. The rainwater tank is getting low, plants not heavily watered have shut down growth as they run out of soil moisture to draw on. Rain will come, but when? And how much?

Previously I’ve had a bit of a stab at charting long-term rainfall trends using Bureau of Meteorology historical data for the town, compared to the recent data from Melbourne Water’s nearby weather stations. With a bit more thought and work I think I have improved the analysis. I’ve also included  more data.

The result, in short, is that rainfall has been declining over the 137 years since the records  began. This appears to be caused mainly by a large decline in autumn rainfall.

I also looked more carefully at whether the south end of town gets less rainfall than the north (as I had previously assumed). It appears that is true and likely to hold with current weather patterns. Continue reading

Burrs: The trials and Tribulus

Tribulus terrestris, three-corner jack

Tribulus terrestris is a terror of a burr. Large, strong spines that can stick into tyres, shoes and of course feet, spreading in harsh dry environments where other plants are struggling, resistant to council spraying efforts.

Locals here usually call it three-corner jack (a reference to the shape of the burrs). Caltrop is another name, taken from a weapon of ancient warfare, a steel spike that was left on the ground to pierce the feet of enemies like a precursor to landmines.

It goes by various common names. One of these, bindi-eye, is more familiar to me as the common name of Soliva sessilis, a small lawn daisy with a nasty burr that my bare feet met as a kid in Queensland.

The weed is well adapted to sandy dry soils and dry weather. It competes for moisture well with other plants, and can survive drought. An annual, it spreads rapidly along the ground in all directions, setting thousands of seeds, which can persist for several years in the soil before germinating. Continue reading

Coffee-table veggie gardeners, beware!

How many backyard gardeners have studied soil science? Who knows the ins and outs of how to best maintain and use a hoe? How many different compost recipes do you know, and how successful have they been for you? Do your plans for bountiful backyard harvests turn into insect-chewed gnarled heads of broccoli, snail-devoured lettuce, and worm-ridden, blight-stricken potatoes and tomatoes? While the pictures on seed packets and nursery seedlings and many popular full-colour gardening books are enticing, actually making it all work is more difficult than many realise at the outset. I suspect many don’t get far beyond the occasional tomato and basil harvest, just big enough to impress this week’s dinner guest, then the crop is virtually finished, the plants exhausted or bolting to seed. Many of us barely manage a couple of tomatoes in pots, oSteve Solomon Growing Vegetables South of Australiar a small bed in the little corner of the lawn or ornamental garden.

Lots of people would nevertheless like to grow a big vegetable garden to get more nutritious, healthy, tasty, fresh food. Perhaps to simply claim a little bit of their personal labour, space and time back from capitalism. It may be a bit “hipster” and inner-city as a trend, but it’s a cheering trend to me. Given that the last serious gardeners in many of our families may have been over 2 generations and 50 years ago (although not in my case), there is a lack of serious knowledge passed down and Steve Solomon’s book, although it focuses on Tasmanian conditions, is good reading for anyone on the island to the north of him too.
Continue reading

DIY Native lawn redux

I posted in 2015 about how to establish a lawn with native grass seeds. But my results were fairly early. Here I report on how it’s going (well!) and re-summarise my (updated) DIY advice.

In a dry but otherwise mostly mild summer, the lawn browned off (that is, leaves died and it turned a straw-brown colour) until we got a good rainfall in early February. Then the summer-growing grasses (redleg grass* and windmill grass*) immediately put on lots of new, green growth. The winter-growing grasses (weeping grass* and wallaby grass*) put up a little new growth, and new seedheads, too. Continue reading